LIFESTYLE

You’ve been playing Monopoly wrong!

This obscure rule changes the whole game.
Getty Images

It’s safe to say that everyone has had a unique and happy (or stressful!) experience with the board game Monopoly. Since 1953 the board game has brought joy, tears, happiness and the occasional argument to family and friends around the world.

It’s safe to say that everyone has had a unique and happy (or stressful!) experience with the board game Monopoly. Since 1953 the board game has brought joy, tears, happiness and the occasional argument to family and friends around the world. 

With over 250 million copies of the game sold, it was probably thought that everything about the game was known! We are well versed in the pain of landing on Park Lane with two hotels. We know the frustration of sitting in jail while everyone around you passes ‘Go’ and collects £200.

But as it turns out, we don’t know the game that well at all!

There’s one rule which, for some reason, none of us knew about (even though it’s in the rulebook) and it changes EVERYTHING.

Other players can bid for a property you’ve landed on and aren’t buying, with the banker acting as auctioneer.

As for what other players would pay for said property, this would then depend on if anyone else bid, driving the price up. If no one bids, then in theory a player could get a property for under market value.

According to the official rulebook, ‘Whenever you land on an unowned property you may buy that property from the Bank at its printed price.

‘You receive the Title Deed card showing ownership; place it face up in front of you. If you do not wish to buy the property, the Banker sells it at auction to the highest bidder.

‘The buyer pays the Bank the amount of the bid in cash and receives the Title Deed card for that property.

‘Any player, including the one who declined the option to buy it at the printed price, may bid. Bidding may start at any price.’

This changes everything!

A game of Monopoly between, say, four players can take hours, or the time it takes before someone flips the board in frustration. 

This rule speeds up the cycle AND potentially makes the property more affordable.

This article originally appeared on New Idea.

Related stories